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20120930
20121008
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama questioned whether the real mitt romney was at last night's debate-- a criticism romney's spokesman dismissed as damage control. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the candidates' appearances today, as they reprised last night's messages about jobs and the economy. >> brown: plus, we have our own debate on the differing approaches to taxes and deficit reduction. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the war in syria, as skirmishes spill over the border with turkey for a second day in a row. >> brown: we come back to last night's debate with two takes on how it was received. ray suarez talked to voters in the swing state of florida. >> i didn't hear what i need to about jobs. that is the number one interest of generally everyone in the united states. >> woodruff: and in our regular "daily download" segment, margaret warner explores how the face off played in social media. >> brown: and it hasn't happened in baseball in 45 years. we
on the battle for north carolina. jeffrey brown reports on the tightening presidential contest. >> brown: barack obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: creating new enriching experiences. through intel's philos
to smoky cabins and labor woes, we get the latest on troubles at american airlines. >> ifill: jeffrey brown updates the story of the butler accused of stealing documents from the pope and leaking them to the press. >> woodruff: hari sreenivasan travels to the electorally important swing state of iowa where the polls opened last week. >> a recent des moines register poll found less than 2% of iowa voters were undecided, which means the campaigns could benefit from locking in votes early. >> ifill: margaret warner examines a genetic breakthrough that could allow doctors to diagnose and treat seriously ill infants sooner. >> woodruff: and we close by returning to a conversation with tonight's debate moderator, our own jim lehrer about his book on past presidential debates. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> w
. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, marcia coyle of the "national law journal" walks us through a term that will tackle affirmative action, and may decide disputes over same-sex marriage and civil rights law. >> woodruff: then we turn to the presidential campaign and the analysis of stuart rothenberg and susan page as the candidates fine tune their messages days before the first debate. >> brown: we zero in on one issue confronting the candidates. hari sreenivasan reports on the safety net program known as medicaid. >> anyone of us at an advanced age really is just one fall away from a broken hip that could end you up in a nursing home. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with author hedrick smith. his new book explores the dismantling of the american dream for the middle class. >> brown: and we look at oppression and empowerment for women around the world, with journalists and filmmakers nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonig
criticized the administration for not creating enough jobs. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, what do the numbers tell us about the true state of the labor market? we get an assessment. >> woodruff: then, gwen ifill reports on missouri's senate contest where the democratic incumbent has unexpectedly grabbed the lead. >> this the united states senate. mark shields an david brooks >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> woodruff: and ray suarez previews another political match to watch, thousands of miles south in venezuela, where long- time leader hugo chavez faces a young challenger. >> the election marks a watershed moment for the world's second largest oil producing nation. and a critical supplier of crude oil to the u.s. its number one customer. >> woodruff: that'all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: carnegie corp >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for publi
times. >> brown: of course that won't stop us from watching... especially by chief justice roberts. >> that's right. chief justice roberts is a very conservative justice. i don't think his ruling in the health care law changes that one bit. >> brown: now the case that they did argue today. it's about using u.s. courts to bring international human rights law into effect against multinational corporations. >> right. brown: trying to spit it out. mulley national corporations is what i'm trying to say. >> it involves a 1789 law, the alien tort statute. very simple, straight-forward law that says federal courts have jurisdiction over actions brought by aliens who have been basically injuredded by violations of international law or violations of treaties of the united states. this is oal business. the court heard arguments last term on whether corporations could be held liable under that statute. then it later ordered reargument on a broader question. that is whether these cases can be brought in u.s. courts against any defendant who committed a violation in a foreign country. and today
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)